Orange Culture

menswear

NIGERIA
RTW
ACCESSORIES
SHOES
JEWELLERY
designers Orange Culture

biography

Adebayo Oke-Lawal has been designing since the age of 10, and launched his own line, Orange Culture, in 2011. Trained as a banker with no formal fashion education, he taught himself to sew throughout internships with various designers before debuting his inaugural collection in at 2011 Lagos Fashion & Design Week. Since its launch, the brand has offered universal silhouettes with an African touch that have drawn attention both on the designer’s home continent as well as on an international stage. In 2014, Orange Culture was a finalist for the LVMH Prize, and as the brand evolves, Oke-Lawal continues to create androgynous looks that are defined by a mixture of Nigerian-inspired prints and contemporary urban street wear. To date, Orange Culture has collaborated with international brands such as Dennis Osadebe, Rokus London, and Maxivive, and recently, Oke-Lawal partnered with Nigerian artist Davido to design a limited-edition collection that was sold exclusively at Selfridges. Drawing inspiration from his country and his heritage, Oke-Lawal has created a truly Nigerian line with an international appeal. Speaking to T, The New York Times Style Magazine, he said: “We’re trying to communicate the idea of a new generation of African men,” about the gender-fluid menswear line. “As a child growing up, I found I was very lost in trying to figure out who I was as a person. I wanted to create a brand that sort of represented that sphere of men: a man that’s vulnerable, a man that’s a bit soft, a man that’s emotional.”

collections

AW'19 Do Not Look Under My Skirt
SS'19 The Orange Moon
AW'18 Raindrops and Tears

Orange Culture

menswear

NIGERIA
Sustainable
RTW
ACCESSORIES
SHOES
JEWELLERY
designers > Orange Culture

biography

Adebayo Oke-Lawal has been designing since the age of 10, and launched his own line, Orange Culture, in 2011. Trained as a banker with no formal fashion education, he taught himself to sew throughout internships with various designers before debuting his inaugural collection in at 2011 Lagos Fashion & Design Week. Since its launch, the brand has offered universal silhouettes with an African touch that have drawn attention both on the designer’s home continent as well as on an international stage. In 2014, Orange Culture was a finalist for the LVMH Prize, and as the brand evolves, Oke-Lawal continues to create androgynous looks that are defined by a mixture of Nigerian-inspired prints and contemporary urban street wear. To date, Orange Culture has collaborated with international brands such as Dennis Osadebe, Rokus London, and Maxivive, and recently, Oke-Lawal partnered with Nigerian artist Davido to design a limited-edition collection that was sold exclusively at Selfridges. Drawing inspiration from his country and his heritage, Oke-Lawal has created a truly Nigerian line with an international appeal. Speaking to T, The New York Times Style Magazine, he said: “We’re trying to communicate the idea of a new generation of African men,” about the gender-fluid menswear line. “As a child growing up, I found I was very lost in trying to figure out who I was as a person. I wanted to create a brand that sort of represented that sphere of men: a man that’s vulnerable, a man that’s a bit soft, a man that’s emotional.”

collections

AW'19 Do Not Look Under My Skirt
SS'19 The Orange Moon
AW'18 Raindrops and Tears